Karen Dillon

New York Times best-selling author and speaker

Reviews of books by Karen Dillon

Nonfiction Business
"This game-changing book is filled with compelling real world examples, including from inside Intuit. Jobs Theory has had --and will continue to have ---a profound influence on Intuit’s approach to innovation. It just might change yours, too." --Scott Cook, Co-founder & Chairman of Intuit

How do companies know how to grow? How can they create products that they are sure customers want to buy? Can innovation be more than a game of hit and miss? After years of research, Harvard Business School professor Clayton Christensen and his co-authors have come to one critical conclusion: our long held maxim—that understanding the customer is the crux of innovation—is wrong. Customers don’t buy products or services; they “hire” them to do a job.
"One of the more surprisingly powerful books of personal philosophy of the 21st century."
Forbes


"[A] highly engaging and intensely revealing work... Spiritual without being preachy, this work is especially relevant for young people embarking on their career, but also useful for anyone who wants to live a more meaningful life in accordance with their values."
Publishers Weekly


"The book encapsulates Christensen’s best advice to keep high achievers from being disrupted in their own lives... [P]rovocative but reassuring: Peter Drucker meets Mitch Albom."
Bloomberg Businessweek


"[M]ore genuinely a self-help book than the genre it disparages. Instead of force-feeding readers with orders on how to improve, it aims to give them the tools to set their own course"
Financial Times
"To help people learn how to use office politics to get things done rather than merely suffer as the victim of the machinations of others, Harvard Business Review Press has just published The HBR Guide to Office Politics by Karen Dillon."
Vedomosti


"Office politics might sound a somewhat throwaway knockabout topic for such an esteemed set of guides but as former Harvard Business Review editor Karen Dillon demonstrates, it's deadly serious. Her guide tackles common quandaries, from an over-controlling manager to a bullying colleague, employing real, practical advice rather than pop psychology, and her guidance on effective conflict management techniques is as sound as you'll read anywhere."
People Management (UK)


"The tagline to HBR Guide to Office Politics is 'Rise above rivalry, Avoid power games, Build better relationships.' It offers dozens of really useful tips to help us do exactly that."
MindTools (mindtools.com)

Books



How do companies know how to grow? How can they create products that they are sure customers want to buy? Can innovation be more than a game of hit and miss?
After years of research, Harvard Business School professor Clayton Christensen and his co-authors have come to one critical conclusion: our long held maxim—that understanding the customer is the crux of innovation—is wrong. Customers don’t buy products or services; they “hire” them to do a job.






From the world’s leading thinker on innovation and New York Times bestselling author of The Innovator’s Dilemma, Clayton M. Christensen and former HBR editor Karen Dillon and James Allworth comes an unconventional book of inspiration and wisdom for achieving a fulfilling life. Christensen’s The Innovator’s Dilemma, notably the only business book that Apple’s Steve Jobs said “deeply influenced” him, is widely recognized as one of the most significant business books ever published. Now, in the tradition of Randy Pausch’s The Last Lecture and Anna Quindlen’s A Short Guide to a Happy Life, How Will You Measure Your Life is with a book of lucid observations and penetrating insights designed to help any reader—student or teacher, mid-career professional or retiree, parent or child—forge their own paths to fulfillment.






Don’t let destructive drama sideline your career.

Every organization has its share of political drama: Personalities clash. Agendas compete. Turf wars erupt. But you need to work productively with your colleagues—even difficult ones—for the good of your organization and your career. How can you do that without compromising your personal values? By acknowledging that power dynamics and unwritten rules exist—and navigating them constructively.

The HBR Guide to Office Politics will help you succeed at work without being a power grabber or a corporate climber. Instead you’ll cultivate a political strategy that’s authentic to you.